Step 87: Play the What If.. game

Step 87 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Play the What If... Game
Step 87: Play the What If… Game

Being prepared for adverse financial situations is an important step to take on your way to financial freedom. Without wanting to sound demotivating (or even morbid), the “what if..” game forces you to think of unwanted but possible situations that might happen and that would set you back on your journey to financial freedom and in some cases would have far bigger consequences than just the financial effects.

We’ve already established the importance of an emergency fund for those times you have a big unexpected one-off expense you need to pay and you should also be well on your way to getting together a 3-6 month living fund in case you (or your partner) lose your main source of income and need to make ends meet until you find another job or income.

Whereas the emergency and living funds prepare you to financially deal with the consequences of a financial setback quickly and efficiently, the “what if…” game prepares you psychologically for any behavioural changes you might need to make to adjust to smaller or bigger changes in your life that might require you to adapt on a longer term.

So let’s get playing… Continue reading

Step 40: Plan your income

Step 40 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Plan your income
Step 40.: Plan your income

For the past 8 steps we’ve looked at different income sources and you have analyzed each one in detail, looking at your own situation to determine whether any of these might be possible avenues for you to pursue further. What else do we want, right?

Well, just one last thing: a plan. If you truly want to change your income, thinking and talking about it is all nice and fun, but nothing will ever happen unless you make a plan and stick to your plan. Feeling inspired to do something about your finances is one thing, but actually getting off your bottom and taking action is what will ultimately determine whether anything will change, or whether it will just remain a fantasy . Continue reading

Step 39: Income stream 7: Rental Income

Step 39 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Income stream 7: rental income
Step 39: Income stream 7: rental income

We’ve got to the last income stream of the 7 different income streams: rental income. This type of income can come from any asset that you own and rent out. The most obvious and well-known form of rental income is the renting out of a building, such as a house or apartment for private use (having tenants living in your property) but it can also be for commercial use, such as the renting out of an office space or shop.

Rental income isn’t limited to the rent of a building however,  you can also rent out other assets that you have, as the recent increase in local initiatives such as rent-my-lawn-mower or rent-my-toolbox-for-a-day prove. So as always: don’t limit yourself by thinking that rental income isn’t something you could ever make any money with as you might well have something that somebody would like to borrow from you and they might happily pay for it if they can’t or don’t want to buy their own version of it, due to financial reasons, or a sense of minimalism (living with less) and is there really a point in buying a drill if you know you’ll only ever use it two or three times a year?  Continue reading

Step 38: Income stream 6: Royalties

Step 38 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Income stream 6: Royalties
Step 38: Income stream 6: Royalties

If you’re like me, you think about famous pop stars when you hear the word royalties and immediately discard it as an option to gain a side income via this yourself. Since you probably aren’t a famous singer, guitar player or author, this isn’t something that would be attainable for you, right?

Turns out, royalties aren’t only for the (already) rich and famous, royalties are in fact paid to whoever creates or invents something that gets sold or used, and more often than not, that can indeed be an author of a not so famous book, or a product that is sold that was patented or an artwork that gets produced and sold en-masse.

Royalties in reality is money you get from people using your ideas, your products or something else that you came up with. After you have created, invented or put together your product in whatever way, other people market, promote and sell it, meaning they are the ones working hard to make the product succesful, but on each sale you get a small percentage of the profit. Or in the case of a franchise such as a a Starbucks franchise, they pay for the use of the logo, concepts and marketing by sending off money to Starbucks. Continue reading

Step 37: Income Stream 5: Dividend Income

Step 37 of the 100 steps to financial independence: Income stream 5: Dividend Income
Step 37: Income stream 5: Dividend Income

Time to look at our 5th possible income stream, which is dividend income. This type of income is based on company profits paid out to the shareholders of that company. Before you dismiss this type of income as not your thing, read on and then jump to the investing steps later on, as you’ll find that investing can be more or less risky, depending on the risk that you feel you can deal with and you can start with very little money, yet over the years build up a considerable portfolio.

Now back to the dividend income. If you have shares in a company, you basically own a tiny part of that company. If that company then makes a profit, some of that profit goes to the owners of that company, i.e. the shareholders. Continue reading

Step 36: Income stream 4: Capital Gains

Step 36 of the 100 steps to financial independence: Income strem 4: Capital gains
Step 36: Income stream 4: Capital gains

The fourth income stream that we’ll look at is that of capital gains. Whether or not you feel like working towards developing this income stream or not (some people don’t), capital gains in a key source of income to many people.

Capital gains are the profits one makes when selling something at a higher price than the original purchase price they paid. The difference with profit income is that profit income comes from something you made or created over time as part of your regular business activity, whereas a capital gain involves an original investment, and then the value of this investment increasing over time, but not a result of a regular business activity. Continue reading

Step 35: Income stream 3: Interest Income

Step 35 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Income stream 3: Interest Income
Step 35: Income stream 3: Interest Income

So we have thought about our first income stream, which was a wage coming from a paid job, as well as the possibilities of a second income stream in the form of profit income. For most people either of these might be their main and only income stream and they might have never thought of other sources of income. Yet there are five more possibilities and even though that doesn’t mean you need to pursue them all, it is always good to at least find out more..

Let’s have a closer look at a third income stream: interest income from money lent out. Money lending and borrowing isn’t usually free, as the lender runs a risk (they might never see their money again), so the person who borrows money is required to pay interest on the loan in return, to make lending money more attractive.

Continue reading