Day 13 / 31 Your 7 Income Streams

Day 13: Your 7 Income Streams
Day 13: Your 7 Income Streams
Day 13: Your 7 Income Streams

Did you know there are a total of 7 income streams? That is 7(!) different ways to make money, of which your job is just one… In today’s challenge you are going to find out about these seven types of income and then discover which one of these might appeal to you most to develop further and start generating some extra money.

The seven income streams are: Continue reading

Step 97: Sequence of Return

Step 97 of the 100 Steps mission to financial independence: Sequence of Return
Step 97: Sequence of Return

Sequence of return – or sequence risk -can pose a serious threat to you portfolio and is a factor to be very aware of and take measures against when you are planning your retirement. Sequence of return can hamper a secure retirement, whether you plan to retire when you are 40, 65 or 80 and it can seriously increase your chances of outliving your portfolio, meaning you might be left with no income towards the end of your retirement.

So what is sequence of return?

Sequence of return is the risk of your portfolio being hit by bad market returns early on in retirement when you start making withdrawals from your portfolio. Like for anybody a bad market return affects the value of your portfolio, but whereas you have time to recover from a few bad years if you are still building up your portfolio, once you start withdrawing you no longer have this time to recover. The value of the portfolio can be affected (i.e. decreasing) by it so much that it threatens its own chances of survival. Not only does your portfolio reduce in value from your withdrawal but also from the market drop.

Let’s have a look at how devastating this effect can be by looking at the portfolio of a retiree who is hit by this phenomenon Let’s say they have $1,000,000 and that the market returns an average of 8% over the first 20 years. This retiree takes out $40,000 (4%) in their first year and then adjust for inflation by 3% each year. Below is the chart with how well they do.

market returns start portfolio take out Total left over
-10% $              1.000.000 $           40.000 $         864.000
-15% $                  864.000 $           41.200 $         699.380
-25% $                  699.380 $           42.436 $         492.708
5% $                  492.708 $           43.709 $         471.449
0% $                  471.449 $           45.020 $         426.429
-15% $                  426.429 $           46.371 $         323.049
5% $                  323.049 $           47.762 $         289.051
20% $                  289.051 $           49.195 $         287.827
10% $                  287.827 $           50.671 $         260.872
25% $                  260.872 $           52.191 $         260.852
30% $                  260.852 $           53.757 $         269.224
15% $                  269.224 $           55.369 $         245.932
-10% $                  245.932 $           57.030 $         170.012
15% $                  170.012 $           58.741 $         127.961
25% $                  127.961 $           60.504 $           84.322
30% $                    84.322 $           62.319 $           28.604
-15% $                    28.604 $            28.604 $                     0
15% $                              0 $                     0 $                     0
30% $                              0 $                     0 $                     0
25% $                              0 $                     0 $                     0

Despite the average 8% return, as you can see, this portfolio takes a big hit at the start of retirement with big negative returns and therefore a big decrease of value early on. Unfortunately after 16 years this person has run out of money and is no longer able to draw anything out of their portfolio. Of the $1,000,000 they started with, they were only able to take out just over $806,000. Continue reading

Step 87: Play the What If.. game

Step 87 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Play the What If... Game
Step 87: Play the What If… Game

Being prepared for adverse financial situations is an important step to take on your way to financial freedom. Without wanting to sound demotivating (or even morbid), the “what if..” game forces you to think of unwanted but possible situations that might happen and that would set you back on your journey to financial freedom and in some cases would have far bigger consequences than just the financial effects.

We’ve already established the importance of an emergency fund for those times you have a big unexpected one-off expense you need to pay and you should also be well on your way to getting together a 3-6 month living fund in case you (or your partner) lose your main source of income and need to make ends meet until you find another job or income.

Whereas the emergency and living funds prepare you to financially deal with the consequences of a financial setback quickly and efficiently, the “what if…” game prepares you psychologically for any behavioural changes you might need to make to adjust to smaller or bigger changes in your life that might require you to adapt on a longer term.

So let’s get playing… Continue reading

Step 40: Plan your income

Step 40 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Plan your income
Step 40.: Plan your income

For the past 8 steps we’ve looked at different income sources and you have analyzed each one in detail, looking at your own situation to determine whether any of these might be possible avenues for you to pursue further. What else do we want, right?

Well, just one last thing: a plan. If you truly want to change your income, thinking and talking about it is all nice and fun, but nothing will ever happen unless you make a plan and stick to your plan. Feeling inspired to do something about your finances is one thing, but actually getting off your bottom and taking action is what will ultimately determine whether anything will change, or whether it will just remain a fantasy . Continue reading

Step 39: Income stream 7: Rental Income

Step 39 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Income stream 7: rental income
Step 39: Income stream 7: rental income

We’ve got to the last income stream of the 7 different income streams: rental income. This type of income can come from any asset that you own and rent out. The most obvious and well-known form of rental income is the renting out of a building, such as a house or apartment for private use (having tenants living in your property) but it can also be for commercial use, such as the renting out of an office space or shop.

Rental income isn’t limited to the rent of a building however,  you can also rent out other assets that you have, as the recent increase in local initiatives such as rent-my-lawn-mower or rent-my-toolbox-for-a-day prove. So as always: don’t limit yourself by thinking that rental income isn’t something you could ever make any money with as you might well have something that somebody would like to borrow from you and they might happily pay for it if they can’t or don’t want to buy their own version of it, due to financial reasons, or a sense of minimalism (living with less) and is there really a point in buying a drill if you know you’ll only ever use it two or three times a year?  Continue reading

Step 38: Income stream 6: Royalties

Step 38 of the 100 steps mission to financial independence: Income stream 6: Royalties
Step 38: Income stream 6: Royalties

If you’re like me, you think about famous pop stars when you hear the word royalties and immediately discard it as an option to gain a side income via this yourself. Since you probably aren’t a famous singer, guitar player or author, this isn’t something that would be attainable for you, right?

Turns out, royalties aren’t only for the (already) rich and famous, royalties are in fact paid to whoever creates or invents something that gets sold or used, and more often than not, that can indeed be an author of a not so famous book, or a product that is sold that was patented or an artwork that gets produced and sold en-masse.

Royalties in reality is money you get from people using your ideas, your products or something else that you came up with. After you have created, invented or put together your product in whatever way, other people market, promote and sell it, meaning they are the ones working hard to make the product succesful, but on each sale you get a small percentage of the profit. Or in the case of a franchise such as a a Starbucks franchise, they pay for the use of the logo, concepts and marketing by sending off money to Starbucks. Continue reading